Contraception: All Guides

Contraception: Quiz

There are many different types of contraception that vary in how effective they are at preventing pregnancy, how much they cost, how easy they are to use, and whether they also protect against STIs. Take our quiz to see how much you know about the different kinds of contraception!

1. The best type of contraception to use to protect me against STDs is:

  1. Latex External (Male) Condom
  2. Hormonal Injections
  3. Birth Control Pills
  4. Diaphragm
The correct answer is: Latex External (Male) Condom.
Latex external (male) condoms are the best form of protection against STDs. Polyurethane Condoms also give some protection. Hormonal injections, diaphragms and birth control pills provide no protection against STDs.

2. Which form of contraception is most often prescribed for girls with severe menstrual cramps?

  1. Contraceptive Sponge
  2. Hormonal Implants
  3. Birth Control Pills
  4. External (male) condoms
The correct answer is: Birth Control Pills
Health care providers often prescribe birth control pills to patients with severe menstrual cramps. Hormonal implants may lessen menstrual cramps, but they are primarily used for protection against pregnancy. The contraceptive sponge and condoms do not have any other benefits except protection against pregnancy.

3. Which type of contraception does not require a prescription?

  1. Diaphragm
  2. Vaginal Hormonal Ring
  3. Birth Control Pills
  4. Internal (Female) Condom
The correct answer is: Internal (Female) Condom
You don’t need a prescription for internal (female) condoms. You can buy them in drugstores. You do need a prescription for the other three.

4. Which form of contraception usually makes acne better?

  1. Birth Control Pills
  2. Hormonal Implants
  3. Spermicide
  4. Diaphragm
The correct answer is: Birth Control Pills
Birth control pills usually improve acne. The other three options listed (hormonal implants, spermicides, and diaphragms) don’t affect acne, so they are not used as a treatment for this purpose.

5. Which of the following provides the best protection against pregnancy?

  1. Diaphragm
  2. Spermicide
  3. Male Condoms
  4. Hormonal Implants
The correct answer is: Hormonal Implants
Out of the four birth control options listed, hormonal implants provide the best protection against pregnancy, with less than 1 woman out of 100 getting pregnant after the first year. The other methods all have higher pregnancy rates.

6.Which one of the following types of contraception is permanent?

  1. Hormonal Implants
  2. Hormonal Injections
  3. Female Sterilization
  4. Intra-Uterine Device
The correct answer is: Female Sterilization
Female sterilization is the only type of contraception that is permanent. This means that once you have the procedure, you will never be able to become pregnant. It is important to know and understand the risks before being sterilized. Hormonal implants last for up to three years; each hormonal injection lasts for either one month or three months; and the intra-uterine device lasts for 10 years (copper) or 5 years (progesterone).

LGBTQ: Contraception

Contraception, or birth control, is important for anyone that does not wish to become pregnant. Especially those who are sexually active, are thinking about becoming sexually active, or just aren’t sure yet. It’s always a good idea to plan ahead for those “what if” moments. Teens of all genders who were sex assigned female at birth can benefit from contraception!

For the purposes of this guide we will use anatomic terms (e.g., vagina), but we know people use a spectrum of terms to describe their body (e.g., genital opening, front opening). You should discuss with your clinician if there are alternative terms you prefer to use to describe your body or the way it works.

What types of contraception are there?

You have a lot to choose from when it comes to contraception. The type of contraception you choose may depend on a number of factors including your anatomy, side affects you do/do not desire, and the partners you plan to have sex with. It’s important to know the different types of contraception methods available for individuals, especially if you are sexually active. It is a good idea to discuss with your clinician which contraceptive methods are best for you and your partner’s health and safety.

Here are some things to consider when choosing contraception:

  • How much do they cost?
  • How effective are they at preventing pregnancy?
  • How easy are they to use?
  • Will they protect me against sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
There are other considerations that may be unique to each person. See table below. (Adapted from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31394072/)
Contraception TypeInvasive/Pelvic ProcedureContains EstrogenEffect on BleedingPrivacy/ Concealability considerationsFrequent DosingNeed to see a doctor to discontinueEfficacy (perfect/typical)
Combined Oral ContraceptivesNoYesMay reduce or stop bleeding if taken continuouslyPill packDailyNoPerfect: 99%

Typical: 91%

Progesterone only contraceptive pillNoNoMay reduce or stop bleeding if taken continuouslyPill packDailyNoPerfect: 99%

Typical: 91%

Combined Hormonal PatchNoYesMay reduce or stop bleeding if taken continuouslyPack of patchesWeeklyNoPerfect: 99%

Typical: 91%

Combined Hormonal RingSelf-inserted into vaginaYesMay reduce or stop bleeding if taken continuouslyRing must be stored in refrigeratorMonthlyNoPerfect: 99%

Typical: 91%

Depot MedroxyprogesteroneNoNoReduces or stops bleedingGiven at your health care providers (HCP) office.Every 10-13 weeksNoPerfect: 99%

Typical:94%

NexplanonInserted under skinNoReduces bleeding (more rarely stops it)ConcealedOne lasts multiple years*YesPerfect: 99%

Typical: 99%

Progesterone IUDYesNoReduces or stops bleedingConcealedOne lasts multiple yearsYesPerfect: 99%

Typical: 99%

Copper IUDYesNoHeavier BleedingConcealedOne lasts multiple yearsYesPerfect: 99%

Typical: 99%

HysterectomyYesN/AStops bleedingN/AOne procedure, permanentN/APerfect: 100%

Typical: 100%

It’s recommended that you use two types of contraceptive methods to help boost your protection against pregnancy and protects against STIs. For example, you can use the birth control pill in addition to condoms. It’s important to remember that while only those born with a uterus (most of whom were assigned female at birth) can get pregnant, anyone can get an STI. If you have unprotected penile-vaginal sexual intercourse and come in contact with semen you are always at risk for pregnancy and sexual intercourse with a partner of any anatomy, put you at risk for STIs. If you practice safer sex, limiting your number of partners, making sure you get tested for STIs to know each other’s status and making informed decisions about contraception, you can greatly lower your risk.

Examples of contraceptive methods:

IUDs

An Intra-Uterine Device (IUD) is a small, T-shaped device that is inserted through the vagina and cervix into the uterus by your healthcare provider, to prevent pregnancy.

There are more than one kind of IUD. Some IUDs (Mirena®, Skyla®, Kyleena®, and Liletta™), contain the hormone levonorgestrel (a type of progesterone). IUDs that contain hormones (levonorgestrel), do a great job of making uterine bleeding much lighter, or in some cases cause it to go away entirely.  IUDs are over 99% effective in preventing pregnancy. This means that’s if 100 people use an IUD, less than 1 person will become pregnant in year.

Here are 4 great reasons to choose an IUD:

  1. Less stress – You don’t have to remember to take a pill every day.
  2. Great option for everyone – Hormonal IUDs can be used with other medications used to affirm gender such as testosterone.
  3. Heavy flow? No problem, Hormonal IUDs are a great option for reducing bleeding
  4. Safety – IUDs are safe and proven to be 99% effective against pregnancy.
  5. Privacy –The IUD is not visible to others, you can choose if and when you tell others about your IUD.

Your healthcare provider will need to perform a pelvic exam while placing the IUD. This may make you feel uncomfortable, nervous, or dysphoric especially if you are Trans or non-binary. If you’re feeling uncomfortable or anxious, talk to your provider before your appointment, as there may be an option for sedation or medications with your procedure. If you’re worried, it’s always helpful to bring someone you trust along to your appointment to help you feel safe.

Depo-Provera® Hormonal Injection

Depo-Provera ® is a hormonal (progesterone) method of birth control. That is given as an injection by your health care provider, every three months. When given at the same time, every 3 months, Depo- Provera ® is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy and its private (no pills to carry around!). It’s also good at controlling or stopping bleeding, however some irregular bleeding is expected to occur with the first injection. Another great reason Depo-Provera® is so great is, you don’t need a pelvic exam to use Depo-Provera. Depo-Provera ® has one downside – if you don’t like how the injection works or how it makes you feel, it can take time to wear off, especially if you’ve been receiving them for a while.

Nexplanon® Hormonal Implant

Hormonal implants (Nexplanon ®) is a type of birth control in the shape of a tiny piece of plastic that goes under the skin in your arm by your healthcare provider. They are about the size of a toothpick and made of a flexible plastic which contains a type of progestin hormone called etonogestrel. Nexplanon ® is 99% effective in the prevention of pregnancy for 3 years. The implant is convenient because it’s private (no pills to worry about) and it can be placed and removed in your health care providers office.  As with any birth control methods, there are downsides, with Nexplanon ® one of the most common side effects is irregular bleeding. Unfortunately, there is no way to know how your body will react until you try it, but if you don’t like it, your provider can easily take it out. Depending on the person, someone may prioritize pregnancy prevention over stopping bleeding; it all depends on your goals. .

The Mini Pill

The mini pill is the progesterone only pill. The pill is about 91% effective, and you need to take it every day at the same exact time for it to be effective. The mini pill is safe and easy for you to control since it’s a pill. While some people don’t bleed at all with the mini pill, it is normal to have some irregular bleeding, too.

The Pill, Patch or Ring

The pill, patch and ring are all methods that contain both estrogen and progesterone. The pill is taken every day, the patch is worn on your skin (anywhere except your chest) and is changed weekly, and the ring is used in the vagina. All of these methods can be used to stop or reduce uterine bleeding and are between 91-99% effective at preventing pregnancy.

Condoms

Condoms and barrier methods (such as dental dams and latex condoms) should always be used for sex, whether you’re on another form of contraception. Although other methods of contraception are great, contraception alone won’t help protect you or your partner against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).  External condoms are worn on a penis and work best when put on correctly. Internal condoms can be used in the vagina to prevent pregnancy and can be used for anal intercourse as well. Condoms are most effective when you use them with another form of contraception (like an IUD, for example). Ask your health care provider (HCP) if they have any free condoms to offer you!

Hysterectomy

Hysterectomy is the surgery where the uterus, tubes, and sometimes the ovaries are removed.  Hysterectomy is 100% effective in preventing pregnancy and stopping uterine bleeding. Hysterectomy is permanent, so you must be absolutely certain that you do not want to carry a pregnancy in the future. Hysterectomy is not typically considered until after a person reaches adulthood and has completed childbearing.

What do I do in an emergency?

Emergency contraception is for those who have had sex that could lead to pregnancy without a reliable method of routine contraception. This is for those situations where a condom breaks, sex occurred without a condom, or you do not have another form of birth control. It’s important to remember emergency contraception (EC) does not work if the women is already pregnant, as it will not cause an abortion. There are three types of Emergency Contraception.

Copper Intrauterine Device: Copper T IUD (ParaGard®)

This IUD is a small copper device that when placed in your uterus (through your vagina), not only prevents current pregnancy but future pregnancies for up to 10 years as long as it remains in place. Although the Copper IUD is one of the most effective methods of emergency and ongoing birth control, it can cause more pain with periods and heavier bleeding. For some people, this can contribute to dysphoria. It can also be uncomfortable to have placed.

Levonorgestrel (1.5mg pills) Plan B One-Step®, Next Choice One Dose®, MyWay®, AfterPill™

Plan B is a pill you can take to help delay ovulation and prevent pregnancy for up to 3 days (72 hours) after unprotected intercourse. There is some pregnancy prevention up to 5 days, but the sooner the better. The pill is available over the counter (OTC), meaning you can go to your local pharmacy, walk in, and pick-up the medication without a prescription! The cost will depend on where you pick it up, so it’s always a good idea to call the pharmacy and ask about coupons ahead of time. It’s important to keep in mind that you may or may not experience some bleeding after taking Plan B. If you have any questions or concerns, call your health care provider (HCP) right away.

Ulipristal acetate (30mg) includes Ella™

This is one pill (one dose) that can be taken up to 5 days or 120 hours after unprotected intercourse. A prescription is often needed for this pill, but in some states a pharmacist can dispense Ella without a prescription. In many cases, a pregnancy test is also needed. Your health care provider can write you an “advanced prescription” for Ella it will be available for you if you have unprotected sex in the future. Talk to your health care provider about this option.

Are emergency contraceptives (EC) perfect?

No method of emergency contraception (EC) is perfect, so it’s important to take a pregnancy test in 3-4 weeks after using (EC). If you develop abnormal bleeding, pain, or pregnancy symptoms (nausea, chest tenderness, etc.), call your health care provider (HCP) right away.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Do my parents need to know I’m getting contraception? I don’t want them to know I’m sexually active.

No, contraception should be a confidential service. This means that your healthcare provider (HCP) should not tell your parent or legal guardian that you’re receiving contraception. If you’re nervous, tell your HCP that you are seeking care that is confidential and you do not want your parents or legal guardian to know. Remember that it can be helpful to talk to you parent or guardian or a trusted adult about your sexual health.

Can I take contraception while on testosterone?

Some trans-masculine teens may worry about these methods working against the effects of gender-affirming hormones (such as testosterone). In most cases you can safely take these contraceptive agents, even hormonal ones alongside testosterone. It’s important to speak with your own healthcare provider so they can help you pick the right method for you and discuss if there is any reason one might be better for you while on testosterone.

My friend was telling me that being on T (testosterone) works as contraception. Is that true?

This is a common misconception! No, testosterone may stop bleeding, but it will not protect you against pregnancy!

What are some things I should consider when choosing a form of contraception?

Everyone’s goals regarding contraception may be different. The below chart are some things individuals might consider when choosing a method. See if any of these are ones that matter to you!

People born with a uterus may benefit from contraception, regardless of their gender. Learn more about who should consider contraception and what options might be available for you!

 

Contraception: General Information

You may be starting to think about what it means to be involved in a sexual relationship. There are many things that you need to think about before you decide to have sex, including whether this is the right person, the right time in your life, and how you will feel if the relationship breaks up. If you do decide to have sex, you need to think about how to prevent getting pregnant and how to protect yourself from getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

You should talk to your parents, guardian, a trusted adult, or your health care provider if you are thinking about having a sexual relationship. It is a good idea to discuss all your choices and all the concerns and worries you may have so you can make good decisions. This can be a very confusing time for you, and it is always good to have someone to talk to.

What types of contraception are there?

There are many different types of contraception that vary in how effective they are at preventing pregnancy, how much they cost, how easy they are to use, and whether they also protect against STIs. Using two types of contraceptive methods, such as the birth control pill and condoms, increases protection against both pregnancy and STIs. Males use some types of contraception and females use other types of contraception. If you are having a sexual relationship with a male, it’s good to know all about the different types of female and male contraception. Together, you and your partner should figure out the best choice for the two of you. Whatever type of contraception one of you uses can influence the health of both people in the relationship. Only females can get pregnant, but everyone can get a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

If you have sexual intercourse, you are always at risk for pregnancy and STIs, but if you practice safer sex with only one partner (who is uninfected and has no other sexual partners) and you make good decisions about contraception, you can greatly lower your risk.

Contraceptive methods include:

Most Effective

 

Effective

 

Least Effective

Contraception: Pros and Cons of Different Contraceptive Methods

Here’s a list of the many available types of contraception, and the pros and cons of using each.

Hormonal Implants
Success Rate with Typical Use: 99%
ProsCons
  • Long-term method of birth control (protects against pregnancy for 3 years after insertion–it can be removed by a health care provider when you want to, or you can wait for 3 years when it’s time for a change of implant)
  • Very effective against pregnancy
  • May cause light or no menstrual periods
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Requires minor surgery and insertion of the tiny rod(s) underneath the skin
  • Requires minor surgery to remove device
  • Can cause side effects such as irregular menstrual periods, depression, nervousness, hair loss, and weight gain
  • Could get infection at area where rod is implanted
Intra-Uterine Device: Two types- LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel hormone-releasing intrauterine system) and Copper IUD (no hormones)
Success Rate with Typical Use: 99%
ProsCons
  • Very effective against pregnancy
  • Provide protection against pregnancy when in place in your uterus- protects as soon as inserted (so don’t need to remember to use contraception if you have sexual intercourse)
  • Doesn’t need daily attention
  • Comfortable- you and your partner cannot feel the IUD, although you partner may feel the string
  • The levonorgestrel IUD (Mirena®, Skyla®, Lilleta®, Kyleena™) lessens menstrual flow and can be used to treat heavy periods
  • Both types do not protect against STIs. Other methods should be considered if high risk for STIs. Needs to be inserted by a health care provider.
  • Slightly higher risk of infection in the first 20 days after insertion
  • Cannot be placed in patients with known uterine anomalies
  • Can fall out or can rarely puncture the uterus
  • Slightly higher risk for infection in the first 20 days after insertion
  • The Copper IUD can have side effects such as menstrual cramping, longer and/or heavier menstrual periods, and spotting between menstrual periods.

 

Depo-Provera Hormonal Injection
Success Rate with Typical Use: 96%
ProsCons
  • Each injection provides 3 months of protection against pregnancy
  • Very effective against pregnancy if used correctly
  • Many women stop getting their menstrual period while getting injections. (This is not a medical problem and menstrual periods usually return 6-18 months after you stop taking injections)
  • Helps protect against uterine cancer
  • Doesn’t interrupt sexual activity
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Need to see your health care provider every 3 months for an injection
  • Depending on your insurance, your birth control may be free or there may be a co-pay
  • May have side effects such as weight gain, tiredness, and possibly a decrease in bone density
  • Many women have very irregular menstrual bleeding or spotting for the first 3 to 6 months and sometimes longer
Birth Control Pills
Success Rate with Typical Use: 93%
ProsCons
  • Very effective against pregnancy if used correctly
  • Makes menstrual periods more regular and lighter
  • Decreases menstrual cramps and acne
  • Makes you less likely to get ovarian and uterine cancer, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts, and anemia
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Depending on your insurance, your birth control may be free or there may be a co-pay.
  • Need to remember to take every day at the same time
  • Can’t be used by women with certain medical problems or by women taking certain medications
  • Can occasionally cause side effects such as nausea, increased appetite, headaches, and, very rarely, blood clots
  • Need a prescription
Hormone Patch (Ortho-Evra) (Xulane)
Success Rate with Typical Use: 91%
ProsCons
  • Very effective against pregnancy if used correctly
  • Makes menstrual periods more regular and lighter
  • Decreases menstrual cramps and acne
  • Makes you less likely to get ovarian and uterine cancer, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts, and anemia
  • Doesn’t interrupt sexual activity
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Still need condoms to lower the risk of STIs
  • Can’t be used by women with certain medical problems or by women taking certain medications
  • Can occasionally cause side effects such as nausea, increased appetite, headaches, and irregular bleeding in the first few cycles
  • Increased risk of blood clots
  • Need a prescription
Vaginal Hormonal Ring (NuvaRing®, Annovera™)
93% (NuvaRing),-97% (Annovera™)
ProsCons
  • Very effective against pregnancy if used correctly
  • Makes menstrual periods more regular and lighter
  • Decreases menstrual cramps and acne
  • Makes you less likely to get ovarian and uterine cancer, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts, and anemia
  • Doesn’t interrupt sexual activity
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Still need condoms to lower the risk of STIs
  • Can’t be used by women with certain medical problems or by women taking certain medications
  • Can occasionally cause side effects such as nausea, increased appetite, headaches
  • Increased risk of blood clots
Diaphragm
Success Rate with Typical Use: 83%
ProsCons
  • Can be put in place right before intercourse or 2-3 hours before intercourse
  • Don’t need to take out between acts of sexual intercourse (protects against pregnancy for about 6 hours, but need to reapply spermicide)
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Need to get fitted by a health care provider and need a prescription
  • May be difficult to find
  • Can’t take out until 6 hours after intercourse
  • Cost $25-$45, plus the cost of spermicidal gel
  • May get moved out of place during sexual intercourse
  • Some women may be allergic to the diaphragm or to the spermicide
  • Need to be re-fitted after a 10 pound weight gain or loss and after pregnancy
  • Can be messy
  • Need to reapply spermicide with each act of sexual intercourse
  • Can cause an increase in urinary tract infections
Cervical Cap
Success Rate with Typical Use: 83%
ProsCons
  • Can insert several hours before sexual intercourse
  • Can leave in place 24-48 hours, will give protected sex for up to 48 hours
  • Use less spermicide with the cap than with the diaphragm, no need to apply more spermicide with each act of intercourse
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Cost $30-$50, plus the cost of spermicidal gel
  • Need to be fitted by a health care provider and need a prescription
  • Limited sizes available
  • Can’t take out until 6-8 hours after intercourse
  • May get moved out of place
  • Some women may be allergic to material of cap or to spermicide
  • Can’t be used by women with a history of abnormal Pap tests
  • Can cause increased urinary tract infections
External (Male) Condom
Success Rate with Typical Use: 87%
ProsCons
  • Lowers risk of STIs
  • Contraception that provides the most protection against sexually transmitted infections (latex condoms are best)
  • Don’t cost much (50 cents each), can buy at almost any drug store (don’t need a prescription)
  • Men feel they can “last longer” when using a condom
  • Allow men to have an active part in preventing pregnancy
  • Have to use a new one every time you have sexual intercourse (can only be used once)
  • May disrupt/interrupt sexual activity as it needs to be put on just before penetration
  • Can break
  • Women may be allergic to latex
Internal (Female )Condom
Success Rate with Typical Use: 79%
ProsCons
  • Provide protection against STIs (new product, so not clear how much protection given) and pregnancy
  • Can be inserted well before intercourse so less interruption of sexual activity
  • Male does not need to withdraw right after ejaculation, as he does with a male condom
  • May move or be uncomfortable
  • Can only use for one act of sexual intercourse
  • Cost about $2.50 each
Withdrawal
Success Rate with Typical Use: 80%
ProsCons
  • Natural, so no side effects
  • Doesn’t cost anything
  • Allows men to be an active part of preventing pregnancy
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Not very effective method of contraception
  • Difficult for male to always predict ejaculation
  • May decrease sexual pleasure of woman since need to always be thinking about what is happening during sexual intercourse
  • No control by women- need to rely completely on men to prevent pregnancy
Contraceptive Sponge
Success Rate with Typical Use: 76-83%
ProsCons
  • Can insert right before or several hours before sexual intercourse and will provide protection against pregnancy for a total of 24 hours
  • Don’t need a prescription
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs and may increase the risk of HIV infection in women who have sex multiple times daily because of irritation from the spermicide
  • Can’t take out until 6 hours after sexual intercourse
  • Can’t be used by women who are allergic to nonoxynol-9 (in the spermicides)
  • Increases urinary tract infections
Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM)
Success Rate with Typical Use (only applies if you meet all conditions): 98%
ProsCons
  • Natural
  • Costs nothing
  • No side effects
  • Only effective in women who have given birth in last 6 months, who have not had a menstrual period after childbirth and are feeding their babies only breast milk
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Only effective until menstrual period returns
  • May need to use a lubricant with sexual intercourse because of vaginal dryness
Fertility Awareness Based Methods
Success Rate with Typical Use: 75-86% depending on method
ProsCons
  • Natural
  • Approved by many religions
  • Woman gets to know her body and menstrual cycles
  • Can be helpful for partners who are very careful and don’t have sex during ovulation period and several days before and after
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs
  • Need to figure out when ovulating for each month, which may be difficult in those with irregular periods
  • Requires a lot of work- need careful instruction and the woman needs to figure out when ovulating
Spermicide
Success Rate with Typical Use: 79%
ProsCons
  • Doesn’t cost much, available at many drug stores, don’t need a prescription
  • Doesn’t protect against STIs and may increase the risk of HIV infection in women who have sex multiple times daily because of irritation from the spermicide
  • Effectiveness usually lasts only one hour (need to reapply each time have sexual intercourse)
  • Some women and men may be allergic to spermicides
  • May interrupt sexual activity (some forms need to be inserted at 10-20 minutes before intercourse)
  • Has a lower effectiveness against pregnancy than many other types of contraception- should use with another form of contraception to increase effectiveness
Tubal Ligation (Female Sterilization)
Success Rate with Typical Use: 99%
ProsCons
  • Very effective against pregnancy
  • One time decision that will provide protection against pregnancy forever
  • Need to have minor surgery
  • Permanent (although it is possible to undo sterilization with major surgery, it’s not always successful)
  • Only should be used by women who are absolutely sure that they do not want any or any more children
  • Expensive- ranges from $1000-$2500- but cost for contraception spread over rest of life
  • No protection against STIs

https://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/contraception/index.htm#Contraceptive-Effectiveness

Contraception: Success and Failure Rates of Contraceptives

These charts show the average number of women who accidentally get pregnant while using contraception over the course of one year.

  • Typical Use: When contraception is not used every time, or it’s not used according to instructions every time.
  • Perfect Use: When contraception is used every time, and it is used according to instructions.
Hormonal Implants
Out of 100 Women Using Hormonal Implants
Typical Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
IUD (Intrauterine Device) LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system)
Out of 100 Women Using an IUD:
Typical Use: 1 or Less Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Less Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Copper IUD (Intrauterine Device)
Out of 100 Women Using a Copper IUD:
Typical Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Female Sterilization
Out of 100 Women Using Female Sterilization
Typical Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Hormonal Injections – Depo Provera- (Progesterone only)
Out of 100 Women Using Hormonal Injections:
Typical Use: 4 Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Estrogen/Progestin Hormonal Injections
(not currently available in the US)
Out of 100 Women Using Estrogen/Progestin Injections:
Typical Use: 6 or Less Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Birth Control Pills – Combination
Out of 100 Women Using Combination Birth Control Pills
Typical Use: 9 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Birth Control Pills – Progestin-Only
Out of 100 Women Using Progestin-Only Birth Control Pills
Typical Use: 7 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Hormone Patch – Ortho-Evra, Xulane
Out of 100 Women Using the Hormone Patch:
Typical Use: 7 Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant womanicon representing 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Vaginal Hormonal Ring – NuvaRing®, Annovera™
Out of 100 Women Using the Vaginal Hormonal Ring:
Typical Use: 7 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 or Fewer Women Become Pregnanticon representing 1 pregnant woman
Diaphragm
Out of 100 Women Using a Diaphragm
Typical Use: 17 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 6 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Contraceptive Sponges
Out of 100 nulliparous* Women Using Contraceptive Sponges
*Nulliparous is a medical term that means a woman has never given birth to a baby
Typical Use: 17 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 9 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Cervical Cap
Out of 100 nulliparous* Women Using a Cervical Cap*Nulliparous is a medical term that means a woman has never given birth to a baby
Typical Use: 14 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 9 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Male Condoms
Out of 100 Women Using Male Condoms:
Typical Use: 13 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 2 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Female Condoms
Out of 100 Women Using Female Condoms
Typical Use: 21 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 5 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Withdrawal
Out of 100 Women Using Withdrawal:
Typical Use: 20 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 4 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Lactational Amenorrhea Method
Out of 100 Women Using the LAM Method:
Typical Use: 2 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 2 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Fertility Awareness Based Methods
Out of 100 Women Using Natural Family Planning: Numbers vary depending on method used
Typical Use: 14-25 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 1 to 5 (average 3) Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Spermicides
Out of 100 Women Using Spermicides: 21
Typical Use: 28 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
Perfect Use: 18 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman
No Contraceptive Method
Out of 100 Women Using No Contraceptive Method
Typical Use: 85 Women Become Pregnanticon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant womanicon representing less than 1 pregnant woman

https://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/contraception/index.htm#Contraceptive-Effectiveness