MRKH: Resources

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Every effort has been made to ensure that the URL’s listed in this section are as accurate and up-to-date as possible. We realize that the internet is constantly changing, and we can only guarantee that the links are accurate as of the date this booklet was printed.

Resources:

  • State by State Surrogacy Law Practice: This is a private website founded by a lawyer who has expertise with matters involving surrogacy. It is not a website that the CYWH necessarily endorses; however there is a color–coded map of the United States on the website that clearly explains the surrogacy laws that apply to each state, which makes it a very good resource. You can find out how the law works in each state just by clicking on the state image. Keep in mind that the practice of surrogacy is ever changing. An experienced attorney must still determine the prevailing practice in a particular state court at the time surrogacy is initiated.
  • US Department of Health and Human Services–Administration for Children and Families: Adoption laws vary significantly from state to state yet they must comply with general rules set by the United States Federal Government. This resource answers some of the questions you might have about adopting a child from child welfare services; however it is not meant to replace a conversation with an attorney that is knowledgeable about adoption laws, the cost, etc. where you live.
  • Domestic Adoption–Parents Magazine: This website is sponsored by “Parents” magazine and does a nice job explaining the different types of adoption offered in the United States. You’ll also find stories from families who talk about their adoption experience.
  • Intercountry Adoption–Bureau of Consular Affairs–U.S. Department of State: This website offers information for United States citizens who are considering adopting children from abroad. Adoption between the U.S. and other countries is different than domestic adoptions and is governed by both the laws of the country in which a child lives and the country in which the adoptive parents live. According to U.S. law, there are two different inter-country adoption practices. These include the “Hague Convention” process and the “Non–Hague” Convention process. An American citizen who wishes to adopt a child must follow the process of the country for which the child is from. You can learn about the adoption practices in most foreign countries by clicking “Country Information”, then searching for a country in the drop down menu.
  • Insurance Coverage for Fertility Treatments by State: The Resolve.org website provides visitors with a list of the 15 states that are mandated by law to provide infertility treatment. When you access the link you can look to see if your state is listed and then click to find out exactly what your insurance company is legally mandated by law to provide. If you don’t see your state listed, there is no law at this time that requires that insurance companies cover treatments such as IVF. However, your personal health insurance may offer coverage.